The Black Mulberry Tree

The Black Mulberry Tree

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Black Mulberry Tree

a) The average life of a black mulberry tree is between 25 and 50 years however a healthy tree can live up to 100 years.
b) Mulberry Trees usually bear fruit in their second year.
c) It is a deciduous tree that gets new leaves in early spring. Green flowers appear with the new leaves and develop into mulberries from late spring through to summer. The mulberries will turn white then pink, purple and finally black, but will not continue to ripen once picked so are left on the tree until they are black.
d) The tree will continue to bear fruit until it is very old and it is commonly said that the fruit of the oldest mulberry trees is the best.
e) There are about 16 known varieties of mulberry trees however the black mulberry is the most common and certainly the tastiest one in Australia. The black mulberry is native to south western asia and Europe.
f) Average annual rainfall in this region is 230mm or 9 inches.
g) Morus Nigra, the genus name Morus is the latin word for mulberry and the species name Nigra means black. It is from the family Moraceae.
h) Mulberry leaves provide food for silk worms. Mulberries are high in vitamin c, are used in tarts, wine, cordial and herbal teas or can be eaten straight from the tree. They were also used in folk medicine for the treatment of ringworm.
i) Although the common Australian back yard mulberry tree is about 5 metres high, some trees can grow up to 12 metres high and 15 metres across. The tree has a trunk diameter of approximately 30 to 45 centimetres and a thick and dense foliage. The lush green leaves can feed an army of silk worms, though the leaves are usually picked and fed to the silk worms, rather than left on the tree where they can be vulnerable to predators.
j) The trees can grow very large and take up the entire back yard. They will grow in most climates except the hot tropics. Dropping fruit can stain paths or cars and also when birds eat the fruit, their dropping can leave a purple stain on your washing on the line or the car.



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Cheryl Trotter

I work full time as a Supply Officer in a hospital. I love being outdoors. I love gardening, boating, dancing, kayaking and nice people.

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